AfroSFv3



My latest short story, Journal of a DNA Pirate, was published in the latest anthology AfroSFv3.

Background:

In 2010, while writing my speculative fiction novel, Soul Searching, and having sent it to a top SA publisher (waiting and waiting) I decided to carry on writing. But I wanted something simple and not as bogged down in size as a novel. I decided a blog style story would work to be able to write every day (almost every day) and rather than having a preconceived idea of where the story needed to go, I would take each day where I left off.
I left it for a while (no ending done) and then revisited it in 2011. And that was it.

During this time I had two large publishers in SA take the Soul Searching manuscript for two years each (with revisions done) before they finally rejected (first – 2009-2011; second – 2011-2013). I took that as a sign that my writing had something to it. I carried on tweaking the novel.

Then in 2014, Fox & Raven publishers in SA had a call for entries for their Havoc/Utopia themed Ravensmoot (volume 2). So I collated the story from the blog and submitted it.

It got in to the final list and came second in the competition. That was one of the first signs that my writing was worthy of publishing.

Unfortunately Fox & Raven closed down, but the Imagine Africa 500 call for submissions came along in 2015 and changed everything for me (Land of Light being my first published piece).

In 2016, Ivor Hartman had a call for submissions for the next installment of the very successful AfroSF anthologies and Journal of a DNA Pirate made the cut!


Find it here: https://www.amazon.com/AfroSFv3-T-L-Huchu-ebook/dp/B07KV5W31D


Reviews and feedback:

“Stephen Embleton’s “Journal of a DNA Pirate” comes across as part short story and part movie script, but he pulls it off nicely. It is the liveliest and most engaging of the stories, a breathtaking narrative. Embleton is a brilliant mind on steroids. He defines and redefines the concepts of space and memory. The defiant insistence on writing his story on his own terms makes the reader envious.”


"Journal of a DNA Pirate by Stephen Embleton is a nasty, vicious, exciting tale – it shows how of group of extremists plan to ‘reset’ humanity, and works well enough despite what some may think is excessive swearing and, perhaps, the story’s setting. The ideas present and how they were explored have definitely put Stephen on my keep-a-look-out-for radar."

Kalin:
The verve of Stephen Embleton's "Journal of a DNA Pirate" is--dare I say?--contagious.

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